Minor Injuries

Starting April 1, 2019, the government will implement a cap on damages for pain and suffering (non-pecuniary damages) from “Minor Injuries” caused by motor vehicle accidents in British Columbia. The exact definition of Minor Injury is set out in section 101 of Insurance (Vehicle) Act  and related regulations.

A Minor Injury includes the following physical injuries:

  • abrasions
  • contusions
  • lacerations
  • 1stand 2nd degree strains and sprains
  • some concussions
  • whiplash associated disorders, and
  • jaw injuries
If one of these physical injuries lasts more than 12 months and makes you unable to work, go to school, or perform the activities of daily living, it may not be a Minor Injury.

In addition, the following mental conditions count as minor injuries, if they do not last for more than 12 months and make you unable to work, go to school, or perform activities of daily living:

  • psychological and psychiatric conditions which do not result in an incapacity beyond 16 weeks
  • some concussions; and
  • pain injuries.
If you are having difficulty determining whether your injury makes you unable to work, go to school, or perform activities of daily living, you should consult a lawyer.

If it is possible that the injuries you have suffered fall within the definition of “Minor Injury”, your lawyer will need to file a claim with the civil resolution tribunal, while still holding open your claim in BC Supreme Court.

The Claim Navigator is a 100% independent free resource developed by British Columbia lawyers.

This page was not prepared, written or approved by the Civil Resolution Tribunal.
The information on this page is for reference only. It is NOT legal advice.
We urge readers to obtain independent legal advice.
See our Lawyer Directory for a list of lawyers familiar with litigation involving the Civil Resolution Tribunal.